Mātaiako: Information for teachers and school leaders

Mātaiako refers to the process of observation and evaluation of learning taking place, and can capture the activities helping learners to move along that pathway.

Mātaiako is about gathering and interpreting information about student progress and achievement and using that information to improve teaching and learning.

Mātaiako refers to the process of observation and evaluation of learning taking place, and can capture the activities helping learners to move along that pathway.

This year, kura and Māori medium settings that use Te Marautanga o Aotearoa are implementing Ngā Whanaketanga Rumaki Māori.

Te Marautanga o Aotearoa and Ngā Whanaketanga Rumaki Māori align strongly with Ka Hikitia – Managing for Success: The Māori Education Strategy 2008–2012. This strategy aims to lift the performance of the education system for Māori students so that Māori are achieving education success as Māori. A key focus of this strategy is to strengthen Māori medium education.

Ngā Whanaketanga Rumaki Māori describe te reo and pāngarau skills that students need to learn at different stages of their schooling. Lifting student achievement in te reo and pāngarau through all learning areas of Te Marautanga o Aotearoa is a high priority for Government.

A key part of implementing Ngā Whanaketanga Rumaki Māori is Mātaiako. Mātaiako is about gathering and interpreting information about student progress and achievement and using that information to improve teaching and learning.

Mātaiako will help your kura build a rich evidence base to support teaching and learning.

We’ve heard what you’ve said …

One message that has come through strongly from teachers and principals in kura and Māori medium settings has been a call for the development of assessment tools, knowledge and practice to support learning. The Ministry of Education has taken note of this feedback and is taking steps to ensure that this support is provided.

A number of initiatives are being rolled out to support Mātaiako and the implementation of Ngā Whanaketanga Rumaki Māori, in particular:

  • work to develop and align assessment tools for te reo and pāngarau
  • professional learning and development for Te Marautanga o Aotearoa and Ngā Whanaketanga Rumaki Māori, and
  • work to address the changing e-Learning assessment needs of kura and Māori medium settings through the provision of reliable Student Management Systems (SMS).

It is important that your kura or school builds its knowledge and understanding about Mātaiako so that it can effectively implement Ngā Whanaketanga Rumaki Māori to support Te Marautanga o Aotearoa.

What is Mātaiako?

Mātaiako is about making sure teachers, board of trustees, principals and whānau know where their tamariki are at so that they can help them plan the next steps in their learning.

How does Mātaiako link to Ngā Whanaketanga Rumaki Māori?

Ngā Whanaketanga Rumaki Māori describes for parents, whānau, teachers and tamariki what tamariki should be able to do in te reo kōrero (oral language), pānui (reading), and tuhituhi (writing) and in pāngarau (mathematics). Mātaiako is strongly linked to Ngā Whanaketanga Rumaki Māori.

Mātaiako will help you form overall teacher judgments about the progress and achievement of your tamariki in these areas, so it will be a key consideration as you implement Ngā Whanaketanga Rumaki Māori.

What is an ‘overall teacher judgment’?

An overall teacher judgment is a bit like putting together a jigsaw puzzle. It is about gathering and analysing pieces of information about how a student has been doing, and putting all those pieces together to make an overall picture of a student’s progress and achievement.

Like any jigsaw puzzle, the picture has to be made up of a number of pieces – no one jigsaw piece can show you the whole picture, just as no one piece of evidence or data can give a true indication of how well a tamaiti is doing.

Information about a student’s progress can and should be gathered in a range of different ways including:

  • observing the processes a tamaiti uses
  • having the tamaiti assess their own or other students’ work
  • giving the tamaiti a range of activities to do
  • talking with the tamaiti to find out what they know, understand and can do, and
  • gathering results from formal assessments using assessment tools.

The range of information gathered should give you a clear picture of areas where the tamaiti is progressing well and areas where more work is needed.

Mātaiako will help you make overall teacher judgments so that you can work with whānau and tamariki to plan their next steps in learning.

Working with whānau

Talking with whānau about Mātaiako will help them understand the learning level their tamariki are currently at, where they should be progressing to next and how you can help their tamariki achieve their next learning goals.

It is important that whānau understand how and why their tamariki are being assessed at kura and how assessment can help their learning. Some parents may want to ask you questions about how and why their tamariki are being assessed including:

  • How is my child doing in class?
  • What is my child good at?
  • Is my child struggling with anything?
  • Where to from here – what are the next steps in my child’s learning?
  • How is the school supporting my child?
  • What can I do at home to support my child’s learning?
  • How can I get involved to support my child’s learning at school?
  • How will I be informed about my child’s learning progress?
  • How can I help my child if I don’t speak Māori?

Making sure you are prepared to respond in a positive and supportive way to these kinds of questions from whānau will help you work together to support the learning of their tamariki.

Reporting to whānau

From 2011, all kura and Māori medium settings that use Te Marautanga o Aotearoa will be required to report in writing at least twice a year to whānau about the progress and achievement of their tamariki in relation to Ngā Whanaketanga Rumaki Māori.

Talk to whānau about what information they want in reports and whether they want them in te reo Māori or English. The report will show if a tamaiti is working within the expectations that have been set for all tamariki at the same level and will outline what the next steps are in their learning.

The report should also tell whānau what will happen next and make some suggestions about what the whānau can do at home to support their tamaiti in their learning.

Mātaiako

Mātaiako refers to the process of observation and evaluation of learning taking place, and can capture the activities helping learners to move along that pathway.

Mātaiako is about gathering and interpreting information about student progress and achievement and using that information to improve teaching and learning.

What does Mātaiako mean for me?

  • Mātaiako is now a key focus – it is important that your kura community knows where your tamariki are at so that you can help them plan the next steps in their learning.
  • It is likely that some whānau may ask you questions about how and why their children are being assessed – other whānau will need help to understand what Mātaiako is and how it can support their child’s learning.

What do i need to know?

  • Work is currently being undertaken to develop and align assessment tools for te reo and pāngarau to help you make overall teacher judgments.
  • Professional learning and development for Te Marautanga o Aotearoa and Ngā Whanaketanga Rumaki Māori is currently being offered in your kura. These opportunities will support Mātaiako.
  • Kura and Māori medium settings must now report in writing to parents in plain language at least twice a year to show how tamariki are progressing in relation to Ngā Whanaketanga Rumaki Māori through Te Marautanga o Aotearoa.

What action can I take now?

  • Contact your local School Support Advisory Service if you would like to be involved in the professional learning and development for Te Marautanga o Aotearoa and Ngā Whanaketanga Rumaki Māori (contact details below).
  • Work with your colleagues and whānau to identify the assessment capacity and capability in your kura.
  • Talk with whānau about Mātaiako so that they understand how and why their tamariki are being assessed at kura. Be prepared to respond to any questions whānau may have about Mātaiako.

Where can I get more information?

  • Contact your local Ministry of Education regional office (contact details below).

School Support Advisory Service

Ministry of Education regional offices

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