Licensing criteria for centre-based ECE services

The Education Act 1989 S310 defines an early childhood education and care centre as premises used regularly for the education or care of 3 or more children (not being children of the persons providing the education or care, or children enrolled at a school being provided with education or care before or after school) under the age of 6—

  1. by the day or part of a day; but
  2. not for any continuous period of more than 7 days.

Centre-based ECE services have a variety of different operating structures, philosophies and affiliations, and are known by many different names – for example, Playcentres, early learning centres, Montessori, childcare centres, Kindergartens, crèches, preschools, a’oga amata, Rudolf Steiner etc.

These centres are licensed in accordance with the Education Act 1989 under the Education (Early Childhood Services) Regulations 2008, which prescribe minimum standards that each licensed service must meet. Licensing criteria are used to assess how the centres meet the minimum standards required by the regulations.

For each criterion there is guidance to help centres meet the required standards.

The publication of the criteria on its own can be downloaded as a PDF [PDF, 719 KB] and printed. 

The licensing criteria were last updated in May 2016.

 

Licensing Criteria Cover

PF8 Storage

  • Criteria
    • Criteria

      Premises and facilities criterion 8

      There are sufficient spaces for equipment and material to be stored safely. Stored equipment and materials can be easily and safely accessed by adults, and where practicable, by children.

      Rationale/Intent:

      To ensure both adults’ and children’s safety by ensuring that equipment and materials that are accessible to adults and children are appropriately stored.

  • Guidance
    • Guidance

      Any examples in the guidance are provided as a starting point to show how services can meet (or exceed) the requirement. Services may choose to use other approaches better suited to their needs as long as they comply with the criteria.

      Storage space is needed for the variety of indoor and outdoor equipment and resources that are required.

      Children will need to have access to enable some choice from stored equipment and materials to support children’s learning.

      Storage for children’s belongings

      Allow plenty of space for children to have independent access to their belongings to give them the ability to take some responsibility for their things, including choosing what to wear throughout the day. It is important to remove anything that may be harmful to children, for example, medicines.

  • Things to consider
    • Things to consider

      • How will storage facilities be arranged to ensure easy access, minimise congestion and ensure safety?
      • How will the range of indoor and outdoor equipment and material be stored?
      • Pay particular attention to frequently used areas.
      • Avoid over stacking both on top of and inside cupboards.

  • Gallery
    • Gallery

      Examples of:

      • storage boxes
      • storage shed for outdoor equipment

      Storage of sand pit toys in wooden storage box.

      View larger image [JPG, 74 KB]

      Storage of sand pit toys in wooden storage box.

      Boy painting with storage shelves in background for art materials.

      View larger image [JPG, 74 KB]

      Boy painting with storage shelves in background for art materials.

      Large plastic drawers in large wooden storage unit.

      View larger image [JPG, 110 KB]

      Large plastic drawers in large wooden storage unit.

      Wooden, open fronted, low level storage unit.

      View larger image [JPG, 98 KB]

      Wooden, open fronted, low level storage unit.

      Outdoor storage shed/unit for outdoor equipment.

      View larger image [JPG, 72 KB]

      Outdoor storage shed/unit for outdoor equipment.